Ethical Travel Guide (print)

Ethical Travel GuideThousands of grass roots, low impact, high sustainability initiatives all over the world struggle to tell tourists they exist. Very few of these inspirational initiatives have the resources or skills to market themselves in an industry dominated by multinational companies. Like its predecessors, the Ethical Travel Guide is a challenge to this dominance, seeking to redress the balance in order to make tourism more fair.

The Ethical Travel Guide is a chance for local communities in destination countries, who are often extremely poor, and dedicated local entrepreneurs to talk to their customers, to promote a more authentic and local experience which they are uniquely able to provide. The first edition went to reprint within a month of publication and was translated into Dutch and Italian. The second edition proved to be just as popular with travellers who were looking for unique and interesting places to stay around the world – places that bring real benefits to local people.

The print edition of the Ethical Travel Guide lists over 400 places in more than 70 countries, many of which you won’t find in conventional guidebooks. Entries include places to stay, organisations, trips, tours and projects, from canoeing the backwaters of the Amazon to luxury breaks in the Indian Ocean. You can stay in very simple, local style accommodation or more sophisticated hotels with western plumbing. But they all have one thing in common. They all support the local economy, bringing much needed wealth to communities. It is a tribute to enterprising people all over the world and a fulfilment of Tourism Concern’s commitment to ensure that people in destinations benefit from tourism.

While this unique Guide provides holidaymakers with fantastic ideas for authentic and guilt free holidays, it also raises vital awareness of the negative impacts of tourism.

The Ethical Travel Guide is available to purchase in our shop or sent free to all new Members. 

You can also access our online version of the Ethical Travel Guide.


This excellent guide has listings for more than 70 countries all local initiatives run on sustainable principles. Tourism doesn’t have to be a dirty world. It might even change your life.’

  • The Guardian ‘The travel bible for those that see a destination, not as a playground, but as someone else’s home’ Leo Hickman, author of The Final Call: Investigating Who Really Pays For Our Holidays
  • Truly inspirational. Taps into the great spirit of adventure within us all, proving you really can take amazing journeys without having to make ethical sacrifices.’ Pen Hadow, Polar Explorer
  • ‘Packed with exciting holiday ideas you won’t find in the brochures.’ Dr Nick Middleton, travel writer and Fellow in Physical Geography at Oxford University ‘
  • ‘A crucial read for any environmentally-aware traveller.’ Ian Waller, Real Travel Magazine
  • ‘This is tourism with the lightest of touches. It’s a new way of travelling for a new age. Book nothing till you’ve read it – it’s the closest you’ll get to guilt-free travel. ‘ Paul Heiney, television reporter and author
  •  ‘The Ethical Travel Guide gives a refreshingly realistic interpretation of the age old quote ‘Leave only footprints and take only photos’, showing how you can leave a positive impact on the places you visit and take away a new depth of experience and wonderful memories – Brilliant!’ Tarka L’Herpiniere and Katie-Jane Cooper, the first people to walk entire 3,000 mile length of the Great Wall of China
  •  ‘As ever, Tourism Concern is at the forefront of efforts to ensure that the benefits of tourism are shared much more equitably’ Jonathon Porritt, Co-founder of Forum for the Future Proves that, rich or poor, we don’t have to stay at home to save the planet, and travel needn’t necessarily involve excessive consumption and retrospective remorse…Easy to read and strangely compelling, TETG is an inspiration.’
  • ‘The Ethical Travel Guide helps you spend wisely: When you visit a village, go on a tour or stay at a guest house listed in the guide, wou can be sure that you are directly benefitting locals and giving back directly to the cultures that make these destinations so intriguing.’ Jackie D’Antonio, Islands (Burrelles Luce)



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One Comment

  1. My Guide To Planning The Perfect Safari |
    September 29, 2015 at 09:16

    […] on the environment or the local people. Luckily, it’s usually very easy to recognise an ethical travel company. They make it a point to tell you about how they conduct their business. Their website […]

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